On Sale This Week: The Day After Thanksgiving
Featured

24 November 2017
 

What to do?

Creating ad sales after Thanksgiving is always a bit awkward for grocery stores. Ads from the week before are usually stretched to the close of business on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. But then what? Each store has taken a different approach.

As always, prices are for this area and for Safeway and Fry's will require at least a Club Membership card. Some may require digital coupons as well. We try to indicate all restrictions, special conditions etc. Sprouts does not require any cards and does not have any special savings days. Every week Sprouts has double ad Wednesday, when you get last week’s and this week’s ad prices. All three stores have digital savings available to those with appropriate accounts.

Go to their web pages for details and directions. Fry’s at least will give you the advertised digital price if you state you do not have the necessary technology. Safeway sometimes has coupons which you can access digitally or clip out of the ad.

Grocery Ad Page Links: Fry’s Food | Safeway | Sprouts

Fry’s has a short, 5-day ad, with prices good November 24-28.

$3.99/5 lb. Halos (seedless Clementine oranges)
$1.99 lb. Ground beef, 73% lean
50% off pork
+ other items.

https://www.frysfood.com/weeklyAd

They also have some digital coupons for specific days:

Friday only

$.99 Kroger Cheese
$2.99 Quilted Northern Bathroom Tissue

Saturday only

$2.99 Screamin’ Sicilian Pizza
2/$3 Tostitos Tortilla Chips

Sunday only

$.99 Kelloggs Pop-Tarts or Special K Bars
$1.49 Kroger butter

If you click on Safeway’s weekly ad, you are automatically taken to their monthly ad booklet.  There are also several Clip or Click coupons included. These prices started October 25 and continue through November 28.

Click on Sprouts weekly flyer icon on their website, and you are taken to a page like this:

But, Sprouts also has a Deals of the Month pamphlet that is 40 pages long, with prices for November 1-29.

What to do with all that food 

The truth is, if you shopped for an army and only had one regiment show up, you have a lot of food remaining in your refrigerator and cupboards.  

We often say that we don’t have leftovers at our house, we have derivatives. 

If you have pizza left in your fridge after a big party, and you eat a slice of it for breakfast, that’s a leftover. But, if you have a roast one night, and make enchiladas the next night with some of the roast, that’s a derivative.

I love this quote from Jennifer McClellan, who writes in her AZCentral article, Food waste doesn't have to be a problem on Thanksgiving, "Leftovers are ingredients in disguise…” 

I once served hamburger 11 days in a row to my family. (It was on sale, of course.) But, I used 11 different recipes and got zero complaints. 

So, if you kept that in mind when you shopped for your Thanksgiving feast, you probably don’t need to do any grocery shopping for several days whether or not the stores have sales.

Now that it’s daylight, and all the dishes are washed and put away, it’s time to take stock of your new ingredients.

You probably have turkey, mashed potatoes, dressing, some veggies, rolls and desserts.

Turkey meat can be made into so many different things. My sister-in-law’s first step is to take all the meat off the carcass and start a pot of turkey soup that night. It might take me a couple of days to get to it.

Take stock of the situation

If you don’t want to make full-blown soup right away, you could just get some stock started. I use a pasta pot and place all my bones inside the basket. Then I fill it with water and simmer for hours and hours until the bones pull apart really easily. I’ve been known to simmer overnight, or all day. When it’s ready, I pull out the basket and most of the separation job is done. I go through the bones to make sure there isn’t any meat I’m leaving behind, and then we throw away the bones and concentrate on the stock.

If you’re going to make soup now, go ahead and add your ingredients. But if you just want stock you can save for later use, let it cool, and then pour 4 cups (or more, it’s up to you) into a gallon freezer ziplock bag and label it with contents, date and quantity. I zip it up tight, and lay it flat on a cookie sheet. It’s ok to stack several together. Put that into the freezer. Then whenever you need turkey stock (you can use it as a replacement for chicken stock) just pull out a bag and let it thaw. You’ll know how much you have if you put the same amount in each bag.

If I am making soup, I’ll add some or all of these items:

Chicken or Turkey stock
Wide egg noodles
Chopped carrots
Chopped celery
Chopped onions
Green beans
Stewed tomatoes
Sliced zucchini
Sliced yellow squash
Rice or barley
Sliced mushrooms
Corn
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Turkey or chicken meat
Turkey gravy

Toss in a few herbs to your liking: sage, thyme, basil, rosemary, marjoram, garlic, parsley. Or not. It’s all up to you!

What to do with the meat? You can substitute turkey in just about any recipe that calls for chopped, sliced or cubed chicken. Tacos, burritos, enchiladas, tetrazzini, spaghetti, lasagne, pasta salad, casseroles, just to get your creative juices going. 

Here’s another soup recipe:

We provided several videos in our Wednesday column for derivative ideas. But, it was just the beginning. 

Here’s a different recipe we like making in our house:

Monte Cristo Sandwiches

White bread (I like an Italian or Sourdough)
Thin slices of turkey
Thin slices ham
Cheddar cheese
Swiss cheese
Two or three eggs
A little bit of milk
Butter

Butter two slices of bread. On one slice of buttered bread, place cheddar cheese, ham, swiss cheese, turkey and then top with the other piece of bread, butter side down. Press down as much as possible so the sandwich will stay together. 

Repeat for as many sandwiches as you like. 

Wisk the eggs together with the milk, as if you were making french toast. Pour into a shallow bowl. 

Heat a frying pan or a griddle, and melt a generous amount of butter on it. 

Take one sandwich, and dip it on both sides of the egg mixture. Place in the skillet, and cook until it is nicely browned. Flip it over and brown it on that side. 

Serve warm.

Some people will use 3 slices of bread, but if you’re watching your calories, you can omit that third slice. Other people will use condiments such as mayonnaise and mustard. You can also change the cheeses if you prefer. Many people use Gouda. Something else that is common is to sprinkle it with powdered sugar when serving it. 

Something different:

Do you like Jamie Oliver? Here’s a whole list of turkey derivative video recipes from him. 

 
53 K2_VIEWS
Lynne LaMaster

Lynne LaMaster is the Founder and Editor of the eNewsAZ Network of websites. She asks a lot of questions! In her spare time, she loves photography, cooking and hanging out with her family.

928.458.5119